The Basic tools of Pinstriping

​Good evening eveyone, and happy hump day!  On monday, I introduced myself in our first pinstriping and custom art blog, I also wrote about my goals for the page, and what you can expect to see. i was going to just do one blog a week, but it seems that there are a few people on here that are just getting started in the world of pinstriping, an...

​Good evening eveyone, and happy hump day!  On monday, I introduced myself in our first pinstriping and custom art blog, I also wrote about my goals for the page, and what you can expect to see. i was going to just do one blog a week, but it seems that there are a few people on here that are just getting started in the world of pinstriping, and would like a few pointers. So tonight, i am going to show you all my basic set up and some cool tips on making it easier to get going. We will break the basics down into sections, so tomorrow night, i will get into how a brush works, how to clean and maintain it, how to load it with paint, etc. so stay tuned!

​1- One of the best pieces of advice i can give to a newbie, is that they need a dedicated place to work, and practice. its no fun having to unpack and repack everything every time you want to pinstripe stuff. If you are like me, you just want to get the brushes out and get going! Here is one corner of my studio. this table serves as my drawing board,  a flat place to stripe on, and a place to keep my kit when i am not using it. its nothing special, just a piece of black plywood and some table legs, but it does a great job at giving me space to work. Another important thing to consider is light. This picture is taken from my point of view while in my chair, and you will notice that bright glow from above. i have a 40'' flourescent bar above my table, as well as the regular lights in the  room, and to top it all off, a window is in the left wall. the more light you can get, the better. also note other important tools hanging on the wall like circle templates, broom, bottle opener, etc, 

2- ​Here is the start to every basic pinstriping kit-  the box! you can use all sorts of stuff, there is no right or wrong way to get set up. The only thing that matters, is that your box works for you. I personally like to use these craftsman boxes for a few reasons-

- they are cheap. boxes like this are usually under 80 bucks. 

- they are tough. i can use this thing for a step stool if i need to, and you can toss it in the back of the truck without worrying if it will break in half.

- they have locking drawers. These are great for when you are lugging it around at a car show, that way you aren't leaving a trail of striping supplies from job to job because one of your drawers decided to go rogue.

- they have tons of space. i can fit eveything i need into one of these, if i plan accordingly. including the paint and thinner, brushes, tape, tools, cleaning supplies, etc. 

​The lid of the box holds all my paint, my thinner, my cleaner, and my pallet. i keep these on the top so i can just work out of the box itself instead of unloading a drawer and trying to find a place to put my pallet while i work. 

​The top drawer holds my cleaning rags, my pallet paper, and a stack of business cards.

​my middle drawer holds all of my random tools i might need. tape, dixie cups to mix paint in, metal cup to hold thinner, brush oil, grease pencils, markers, and some prying tools for good measure.

​the bottom drawer holds my brush boxes.

​The next good piece of info to have, is what to hold brushes in. there are tons of boxes you can buy online for the soul purpose of holding oiled brushes, but since i am cheap, i came up with a couple tin boxes and some non hardening clay. This method works great for the guy or gal who is just getting started because its cost effective, and your brushes wont move when you stick them down. the hairs of your brushes need to stay oiled and in thier original shape. and the clay does this job perfectly.

​Two basic tin boxes i had laying around. note the odorless mineral spirits, this is what i use to thin paint and clean brushes with. 

​I use this big box for my lettering quills and my pictorial brushes. this box is about 12 inches long, 6 inches wide, and 3/4 inch deep. i point my brushes toward eachother to maximize space inside the box.

​Here is my striper box. this one is only about 7 inches long, 3 inches wide, and 1/2 inch deep. i just roll a piece of clay into a snake, and then smash it into the box, leaving a peak in th middle to cradle the handles of the brushes. you could throw this box across the yard, open it, and the brushes will be sitting in the same spot you put them in.

​Now you have seen how i keep all my stuff organized while traveling around. this is one of the most bulletproof ways to start a basic kit. just remember, there is no wrong way to get the job done. its all about how you want your stuff set up. stay tuned, because we will be going over how to maintain brushes and supplies soon, and  thanks again for reading my rants!

Have a great night

-james


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Awesome post James, you da man The Basic tools of Pinstriping - News and blogs - Hot Rod Time lol Looking forward to more!

  SteveFern
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